Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Home Contact Us Links Sitemap FAQ Guest Book
 
About TA
Projects
Philanthrophy
Speaker's Engagement
Publications
Press Release
TA Hot Topics
Photo Gallery

TA Speech at 5th WIEF
TA Dialog with FOR
About TA

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Biography | Selayar Island

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Back

Selayar Dances

History of Selayar Island

Spelled Selayar, or Selajar, also called Saleyar  or Kabia (Indonesian: Kabupaten Selayar, Dutch: Saleijer)
Selayar Islands(Kepulauan Selayar). It lies off the coast of Cape Bira of South Sulawesi Province. lies in the Flores Sea, between Sulawesi and Flores. Kabupaten Selayar is the Selayar Regency, covering 903,35 km² with a population of about 100,000. There are 73 islands, the principal being Selayar Island. To the east lies Pulau (Island) Kalaotoa and Pulau Karompa Lompo in Sulawesi Tenggara, and the West Kepulauan Sabalana (Sabalana Islands). It is bio diverse diving site.
Selayar, a secluded island, far away from mass tourism. Myths have been kept alive on this small island which once lay on the Chinese trade route. The west side of the island is mainly inhabited by fishermen, who live in small villages that continue to follow their traditions largely unaffected by western influences. Besides traditional fishing, the growing of vanilla and tangerines generate the main sources of income on the island.

Selayar Straits (Selat Selayar) is more than 100 fathoms deep and, running in a strong current, is dangerous for native ships to navigate. The strata of Selayar island are all sedimentary rocks: coraffine limestone, occasionally sandstone; everywhere, except in the north and north-west, covered by a fertile soil. The watershed is a chain running throughout the island from N. to S., reaching in Bontona Haru 5840 ft., sloping steeply to the east coast.

People
The population, mainly a mixed race of Makassars, Buginese, the natives of Luvu and Buton, is estimated at 57,000 on the main island and 24,000 on the dependent isles. They use the Makassar language, are for the most part nominally Mahommedans (though many heathen customs survive), and support themselves by agriculture, fishing, seafaring, trade, the preparation of salt (on the south coast) and weaving. Field work is largely performed by a servile class. Raw and prepared cotton, tobacco, trepang, tortoise-shell, coconuts and coconut oil, and salt are exported. There are frequent emigrations to Sulawesi and other parts of the archipelago. For that reason, and also on account of its excellent horses and numerous water buffaloes, Saleyer is often compared with Madura, being of the same importance to Celebes as is Madura to Java.